Arctic Dinosaurs!

Featured picture above: A Whollysaurs rex!

Reptiles in northern or southern latitudes undergo hibernation as seasons change and temperatures drop.  The painted

Hibernating den of snakes.

Hibernating den of snakes.

turtle can endure some of the harshest winter conditions and thrives as far north as southern Manitoba.  Tortoises, snakes, and other lizards are not cold hardy creatures. The species richness for lizards and snakes drops rapidly as higher latitudes are reached. All reptiles are dependent on the ambient temperature and their bodies must reach a critical temperature in order to eat or defecate just to survive.  This is often why snakes, lizards, and turtles are found resting on the blacktop of highways in rural communities during the spring, as seasonal temperatures rise.  The surface of the road absorbs solar rays and this heat is transmitted to the animals as they rest, warming up their bodies so they can start their day.

Turtle warms up on the highway.

Turtle warms up on the highway.

In the past decade, many fossils of large meat eating and herbivorous dinosaurs have been found in sedimentary rocks of Alaska.  Just as many fossils and even petrified forests have been found in the little bit of land exposed from the ice sheets of the Antarctic.  Entire standing forests are being found as the ice sheets melt back exposing leaves, moss and woody material on the forest floor that look no different than current deciduous forest floors.  Most recently,

Arctic Fossil Dinosaurs.

Arctic Fossil Dinosaurs.

the partial skull of a small Tyrannosaur was found in deposits as far north as the Arctic Circle.  It was given a new name though it appears to be a small T. rex.  All of these animal discoveries present a bewildering array of lizard-like creatures that do not have the endothermic metabolism to endure such cold temperatures as seen in Alaska today, much less survive the winters in any sort of state of hibernation.  What we know of reptile hibernation is an important clue to how these fossils should be interpreted.  Yet the conclusion to the article is this: “The discovery of Nanuqsaurus hoglundi provides new insights into tyrannosaurid adaptability and evolution in an ancient greenhouse Arctic.”[i]  Though the article rests on the belief that the Arctic was not much warmer than it is today they decided that this particular ancient moment in geologic time must have provided greenhouse conditions.  These admissions are obvious excuses embedded into the article to make it more believable.  In fact, this region was supposedly closer to the North Pole at the presumed time of the animal’s life.

Snakes hibernate underground, in caves or the burrows of other animals.  Some do this in swarms to generate some heat and to capitalize on the warmth of the cave conditions.  Turtles can dig into the soft mud of river bottoms or banks and hibernate under the water, even when rivers and lakes freeze over.  Tortoises like the box turtle bury themselves under composts or forest debris and deep into the soil near decaying logs.  Again, the heat of the earth keeps their bodies above the freezing point.

Comparative size of some therapod dinosaurs. A, Nanuqsaurus hoglundi, based on holotype, DMNH 21461. B, Tyrannosaurus rex, based on FMNH PR2081. C, Tyrannosaurus rex, based on AMNH 5027. D, Daspletosaurus torosus, based on FMNH PR308; E, Albertosaurus sarcophagus, based on TMP 81.10.1; F, Troodon formosus, lower latitude individual based on multiple sources and size estimates; G, Troodon sp., North Slope individual based on extrapolation from measurements of multiple dental specimens.

Comparative size of some therapod dinosaurs.
A, Nanuqsaurus hoglundi, based on holotype, DMNH 21461. B, Tyrannosaurus rex, based on FMNH PR2081. C, Tyrannosaurus rex, based on AMNH 5027. D, Daspletosaurus torosus, based on FMNH PR308; E, Albertosaurus sarcophagus, based on TMP 81.10.1; F, Troodon formosus, lower latitude individual based on multiple sources and size estimates; G, Troodon sp., North Slope individual based on extrapolation from measurements of multiple dental specimens.

Arctic dinosaurs compete for survival.

Arctic dinosaurs compete for survival.

But where do you hide a herd of triceratops?  Where can a T. rex go when the snow starts to fall?

Collecting fossils is a fascinating occupation and just as enjoyable as a hobby.  Piecing the bones together, that have been crushed and disassembled by time and earth movement is a challenge and takes real expertise in animal anatomy.  Typically, where the fossils are found and their condition after death reveals some things about how they lived and how they died.  Many vertebrate fossils are the remains of dis-articulated animals (their bodies have been torn apart from the decay and turbulence of the waters that buried them).  Some fossils show signs of disease like tumors or arthritis and others show the battle scars of deadly engagements.  Some very rare finds are preserved so well, even the color and scaly texture of their skin is apparent.  Fossilized egg nests, fossil dung, and even animals fossilized in combat have been found.  Very rarely, a fossil is found which is fully or near fully intact.

Actual fossil fragments.

Actual fossil fragments.

Those who are convinced that plate tectonics have moved the continents and that the seasons we have today were the same in the distant past, at least back to 100 million years ago, also believe they can recreate a scene where dinosaurs survive the arctic conditions.  For these scientists it must be so, since the assumptions of continental drift and the rotation of the earth have remained unchanged for eons.  How does a T. rex survived the winter of the Arctic Circle? To evolutionists and materialistic scientists it had to survive or we would not find the bones in these strange and seemingly out of place burials.  DNA, blood cells, bone tissue, blood vessels, and fragile organic molecules like proteins, which have been found in the bones of a number of large dinosaur fossils supposedly 70 million years old, defy what we know about decay and the longevity of organic remains.  Imagining that dinosaurs survived the arctic without hibernation or wool coats is not so difficult when scientists are used to believing impossible things.

Arctic dinosaur fossils are abundant.

Arctic dinosaur fossils are abundant.

When does science become make believe?  When will the facts surrounding the catastrophic death of the dinosaurs and their burial in oceanic sediments be reinterpreted in light of those same facts?  How do the frozen and petrified forests of Antarctica, Russia, North America as well as the remains of animals found drowned and buried in ocean sediments around the world prove too much for the current theories of slow sedimentation rates and the dreary march of endless time?

Seems those crazy Noahian flood followers have more to their theories than scientism will give them credit for… pre flood global paradise followed by a global flood that drowned and buried every living land animal, thousands of dead animals encased in concreted sedimentary rock, and a world full of post flood evidence.

 

Must we wait for the day a fossilized saddle is found across the back of Triceratops or when fossilized human remains are pulled from the skeletal gut of a therapod like T. rex?  These ideas sound completely insane but to a molecular and cellular biologist so does the discovery of blood cells surviving 65 million years; and yet not a quiver of doubt rises in the mind of the faithful Darwinists.

Polar dinosaurs... hot blooded?

Polar dinosaurs… hot blooded?

 


[i] Anthony R. Fiorillo and Ronald S. Tykoski.  A Diminutive New Tyrannosaur from the Top of the World. March 2014 | Volume 9 | Issue 3 | e91287

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