Keeping the myth alive.

Our science has been looking for earth-like worlds for decades now.  Radio signals, stars like our own, wobbles in the light spectra coming from distant suns that may indicate an orbiting planet are all part of the search for other worlds with potential life.   A recent discovery turned out to be “the planet that wasn’t there.” The Kepler space telescope found a planet 60% larger than earth, three times the mass, 1.5 billion years older with a solar year of 385 days some 1400 light years away.  Plant life could possibly live there but animal life might be hindered since the gravity is so strong.  Furthermore, it orbited within the zone thought to allow for liquid water; an essential for chemistry to occur.  With all these known facts, a second look proved this planet was only background distortion from the giant red sun that the planet was orbiting.   Oops!

Like early explorers mapping the continents of our globe, astronomers are busy charting the spiral structure of our galaxy, the Milky Way. Using infrared images from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope, scientists have discovered that the Milky Way's elegant spiral structure is dominated by just two arms wrapping off the ends of a central bar of stars. Previously, our galaxy was thought to possess four major arms. This artist's concept illustrates the new view of the Milky Way, along with other findings presented at the 212th American Astronomical Society meeting in St. Louis, Mo. The galaxy's two major arms (Scutum-Centaurus and Perseus) can be seen attached to the ends of a thick central bar, while the two now-demoted minor arms (Norma and Sagittarius) are less distinct and located between the major arms. The major arms consist of the highest densities of both young and old stars; the minor arms are primarily filled with gas and pockets of star-forming activity. The artist's concept also includes a new spiral arm, called the "Far-3 kiloparsec arm," discovered via a radio-telescope survey of gas in the Milky Way. This arm is shorter than the two major arms and lies along the bar of the galaxy. Our sun lies near a small, partial arm called the Orion Arm, or Orion Spur, located between the Sagittarius and Perseus arms.

Like early explorers mapping the continents of our globe, astronomers are busy charting the spiral structure of our galaxy, the Milky Way. Using infrared images from NASA’s Spitzer Space Telescope, scientists have discovered that the Milky Way’s elegant spiral structure is dominated by just two arms wrapping off the ends of a central bar of stars. Previously, our galaxy was thought to possess four major arms.
This artist’s concept illustrates the new view of the Milky Way, along with other findings presented at the 212th American Astronomical Society meeting in St. Louis, Mo. The galaxy’s two major arms (Scutum-Centaurus and Perseus) can be seen attached to the ends of a thick central bar, while the two now-demoted minor arms (Norma and Sagittarius) are less distinct and located between the major arms. The major arms consist of the highest densities of both young and old stars; the minor arms are primarily filled with gas and pockets of star-forming activity.
The artist’s concept also includes a new spiral arm, called the “Far-3 kiloparsec arm,” discovered via a radio-telescope survey of gas in the Milky Way. This arm is shorter than the two major arms and lies along the bar of the galaxy.
Our sun lies near a small, partial arm called the Orion Arm, or Orion Spur, located between the Sagittarius and Perseus arms.

So far, we are alone in the vast universe.  That doesn’t bother me.  It confirms what I would expect if indeed the origin of all things followed the recorded history of Moses’ Genesis account.  I would love to discover habitable worlds or to have the technology to terraform Mars, Venus or the moons of Jupiter and Saturn.  The vastness of space is exciting but if it is empty or completely uninhabitable it will be a disappointment.

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Science of discovery is exciting.  But we may not have the technology yet to really do the searches that will be profitable for the expansion of life into space.  We certainly don’t have the ability to travel outside the solar system yet.  Only some Star Trek technology will get us to where we may one day need to go.  It is an exciting time to be alive.

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While I think it is too soon to give up, many in this field of science are so disappointed in their results they are suggesting that we look for signals that intelligent life existed and has self-annihilated.  Planetary debris fields with atomic radiation signals and other signs of global destruction would suggest that we may be alone now but life once did exist.

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Think this is a worthy pursuit?  I don’t.  It seems like a means to keep a myth alive.  To keep believing that life “evolved” here by “proving” life evolved out there by making up any rational to keep this idea alive.  This is nuts.  If there is no life out there, admit it.   Admit that we are a special creation.  After all, you can’t prove life arose from non-life.  You can’t prove that life evolved from molecules to man.  You can’t see life evolving now or for that matter your will never see it since no one can live a million years or so to prove this to be true.  Yet, science is clinging to these failed hypotheses.  Adding another tier of hypotheticals to assuredly failed “best guesses.”   This does nothing more than propagate the myth of evolution!

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At what point do our sciences begin to believe the facts?  Belief in myths like evolution has supported humanism, right by might, and the belief that our rights come from government.  I am opposed to these ideas as well.  I am a free agent endowed by my creator with certain unalienable rights.  I like it that way for sure.  But so far, it seems to be the absolute truth about reality.

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Psalm 78:69 He built his sanctuary like the heights, like the earth that he established forever.

2 Responses to “Keeping the myth alive.”

  1. Kyle Koelsch

    It often appears that institutionalized science would promote anything, no matter how impossible, as long as it denies the possibility of a designer- specifically the God of Christianity.

    Reply

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